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Beamed into court: The drawbacks of videoconferencing

June 17th, 2013 by Ellen Garrison | No Comments

Beamed into court: The drawbacks of videoconferencing

Immigration lawyer A. Olusanjo Omoniyi knows that the courts might save money by using video conferencing, but it’s also been…


Desperate and alone: Unaccompanied minors traveling to the U.S. in record numbers seek legal aid

June 17th, 2013 by Katie-Meelel Nodjimbadem | No Comments

Desperate and alone: Unaccompanied minors traveling to the U.S. in record numbers seek legal aid

Privacy lawyer Sachi Jepson looked forward to working at an international law firm in Washington D.C. because of the firm’s…


What happens if a refugee and family move from the location or state where they were originally placed?

December 7th, 2010 by Shireen Ali Mirza | No Comments

What happens if a refugee and family move from the location or state where they were originally placed?

Before finalizing the decision to move, refugees are strongly advised to inform their refugee resettlement agency, more specifically their case manager, as soon as possible. They will be helped with the logistics of moving as well as contacting agencies in the new state for future reference.


Is the U.S. government the only agency to provide funding and other support for refugees? Who else is involved and what do they typically provide?

December 1st, 2010 by Kaitlyn Jakola and Fabiano Leal | No Comments

Is the U.S. government the only agency to provide funding and other support for refugees? Who else is involved and what do they typically provide?

“The funds that refugee resettlement agencies get from the federal government is simply not enough,” says Greg Wangerin, executive director of RefugeeOne. “We need to find additional sources of money to welcome refugees with dignity to enable them to get started in a new life.”


Do refugees come to the United States with a clean bill of health?

November 30th, 2010 by Kate Mullersman and Kevin Short | No Comments

Do refugees come to the United States with a clean bill of health?

The barrier to entry into the United States frequently comes in the form of one’s own immune system for refugees seeking resettlement in the United States. U.S. law stipulates that resettlement exists as a humanitarian policy for individuals who have faced or fear persecution due to race, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular political group. But not all refugees fitting these criteria will be eligible for resettlement.


Who pays the airfare to transport refugees to the U.S., and how does it work?

November 30th, 2010 by Christina Alexander | No Comments

Who pays the airfare to transport refugees to the U.S.,  and how does it work?

The price of Boris Patrick Mouanou Ngoma’s freedom from persecution didn’t come cheap. For his plane ticket alone, Ngoma was indebted to the U.S. government for $1,300 since it had fronted that amount after agreeing to his resettlement in Chicago.


What is the first day for a refugee like?

November 30th, 2010 by Stephanie Arias and Meixi Ng | No Comments

What is the first day for a refugee like?

For refugees entering the U.S. for the first time, the first few days run the gamut of emotions. From learning how to use the appliances in their apartment to navigating a new transit system, their first day in the States is the beginning of a journey to rebuild their lives.




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